Timothy Smith

Timothy Smith

Timothy Smith

Tim manages hundreds of SQL Server and MongoDB instances, and focuses primarily on designing the appropriate architecture for the business model.

He has spent a decade working in FinTech, along with a few years in BioTech and Energy Tech.He hosts the West Texas SQL Server Users' Group, as well as teaches courses and writes articles on SQL Server, ETL, and PowerShell.

In his free time, he is a contributor to the decentralized financial industry.

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Timothy Smith

Troubleshooting some waits issues

May 10, 2016 by

Background

On occasion, I’ll see waits that exceed what I expect well above normal and a few of them have some architecture and standards to consider following when troubleshooting, though like most waits’ issues, there can be other underlying factors that are happening as well. In this article, I investigate the three waits ASYNC_NETWORK_IO and WRITELOG. In general, waits vary by environment and server, so before reading this article an immediate question to ask is, “Do you know what’s normal for yours?” When a wait suddenly spikes, or if the architecture is designed in a manner that should prevent a specific wait from consuming time, and yet you see that the wait does, I would be concerned. In addition, because applications and environments differ by architecture, you may want to consider other troubleshooting steps, as these may not apply to your situations.

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How to build better alerting

May 4, 2016 by

Background

One of the most popular complaints from developers to DBAs involves alerting, whether from third party tools or alerting built by other developers or DBAs in the environment. Building or using alerts for important applications, data layers, or processes within a SQL Server environment offer everyone benefits, but can become noisy if they’re architected poorly, or the purpose isn’t considered. In this article, we look at considerations for building effective alerts that tell us when something is wrong without creating situations where we learn to disregard them. We want to make sure that we respond when we need to, and not always be on high alert when there is no issue.

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Understanding the distribution scale of transactional and snapshot replication

January 25, 2016 by

Background

If an environment chooses to use snapshot or transactional replication, one useful exercise is to ask the technical end user (or client) what they think replication does. If you have access to a white board, you can even ask them to demonstrate what they think replication will do for their data. Generally, these technical end users will plot something similar to the below image, where we see a table with data being copied to another table with data.

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