Monitoring

Jignesh Raiyani
PLE in Windows Performance Monitor

Page Life Expectancy (PLE) in SQL Server

July 17, 2020 by

Page Life Expectancy (PLE) is an age of a data page in seconds in the buffer cache or buffer memory after querying the tables with the loading data page into the buffer memory. Page Life Expectancy value indicates the memory pressure in allocated memory to the SQL Server instance. In most of the cases, a page will be dropped from buffer periodically.

Read more »
Ed Pollack
Execution plan when using a system DMV instead of COUNT.

SQL Server Database Metrics

October 2, 2019 by

Summary

There is a multitude of database metrics that we can collect and use to help us understand database and server resource consumption, as well as overall usage.

This data can include hardware statistics, such as measures of CPU or memory consumed over time. We can also examine database metadata, including row counts, waits, and deadlocks.

Read more »
Ed Pollack
Row Count Metrics

Using SQL Server Database Metrics to Predict Application Problems

September 27, 2019 by

Summary

Database metrics can be collected, maintained, and used to help predict when processes go awry so problems can be resolved before they become severe. Understanding when an application or process misbehaves is not always easy. We are often left waiting until a server, application, or service breaks or enters an undesirable state before we know something is wrong. At that point, we are forced to rush and resolve a production problem quickly, before its impact becomes severe.

Read more »
Ben Richardson
Screenshot of Query Store fully enabled.

Performance Monitoring via SQL Server Query Store

August 19, 2019 by

SQL Server Query Store is a performance monitoring tool that helps us evaluate the performance of a SQL query in terms of several different performance metrics such as CPU and Memory Consumption, execution time and the I/O cycles consumed by the query. Query store is similar to the windows “Task Manager”. A task manager provides information about the CPU, Memory, Network and Disc consumption of a process. Similarly, the Query Store provides insight to similar information.

Read more »
Sifiso W. Ndlovu
Data imported using Custom SQL Statement.

Monitor batch statements of the Get Data feature in Power BI using SQL Server extended events

July 1, 2019 by

One shared characteristic among popular data visualization tools such as Power BI is the ease at which data can be extracted from a variety of disparate data sources, usually at a click of a button, as shown in Figure 1. Such convenience, though, tends to come at a cost as you often have little control over how background scripts used to extract data are generated. Yet, this should be of utmost concern for data architects and BI developers alike as rarely do you find auto-generated scripts that are efficient and optimal. In this article, join me as I put on my DBA hat and trace, monitor and review SQL batch statements that are auto-generated by the Get Data feature in Power BI using SQL Server Extended Events.

Read more »
Ahmad Yaseen
sys.databases result showing log_reuse information

SQL Server Transaction Log Growth Monitoring and Management

April 1, 2019 by

In the previous articles of this series on the SQL Server Transaction Log, we discussed the importance of the SQL Server Transaction Log and the role that it plays in maintaining the database consistency, by ensuring that the committing transactions data will be preserved and the failed transaction will be rolled back. It also helps to recover the database to a specific point in time in case of system or hardware failure. This is achieved by writing a log record to the SQL transaction log file before writing the data pages to the physical data file, using Write-ahead Logging process.

Read more »
Nikola Dimitrijevic

SQL Server trace flags guide; from -1 to 840

March 4, 2019 by

SQL Server trace flags are configuration handles that can be used to enable or disable a specific SQL Server characteristic or to change a specific SQL Server behavior. It is an advanced SQL Server mechanism that allows drilling down into a hidden and advanced SQL Server features to ensure more effective troubleshooting and debugging, advanced monitoring of SQL Server behavior and diagnosing of performance issues, or turning on and off various SQL Server features

Timothy Smith

Tracking Times In Data Flows for Finding Performance Issues

January 9, 2019 by

We’re facing a challenge with several of our data flows that use more time than they have in the past and we’re not sure when this trend started. We know in the past month, our reports have been delayed by over a day from the start to the finish. For some of our data flows we use SQL Server Agent that calls SSIS packages or procedures, while some of them use a custom data import and reporting application we’ve created. How can we track the length of time for these data flows, since we’re using a combination of tools for importing data?

Rajendra Gupta

Helpful Linux commands for SQL Server DBAs – top

December 11, 2018 by

SQL Server 2017 and SQL Server 2019 supports both the Linux operating system. As part of performance troubleshooting or monitoring resources in Windows system, we need to check certain things like disk space, CPU or Memory consumption, check running processes, uptime etc. We can get the information, on a windows based SQL server, from the task manager.

Bojan Petrovic

How to collect performance and system information in SQL Server

August 16, 2018 by

Introduction

In this article, we’re going through many of the tools we can use for monitoring SQL Server performance. SQL Server is chock-full of lots of good reports that allow a DBA to quickly spot whether there is any current performance bottleneck on the SQL Server. Many of these sit on top of DMVs but they give us a visually interactive way to look and work with the data. We’re going to start with SQL Server Performance Dashboard Reports.

Dashboard Reports

Let’s jump into SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) and the first thing we’re going to take you through out-of-the-box dashboard reports of all levels. They can be found by right-clicking the SQL Server instance in Object Explorer, and from the context menu, you’ll find Reports > Standard Reports:

Read more »