Database development

Timothy Smith

Working With Line Numbers and Errors Using Bulk Insert

January 10, 2019 by

In the first part of reviewing the basics of bulk insert, we looked at importing entire files, specifying delimiters for rows and columns, and bypassing error messages. Sometimes we’ll want to skip first and ending lines, log errors and bad records for review after inserting data, and work with data types directly without first importing using a varchar and converting to the data type later. In this part, we look at these techniques using T-SQL’s native bulk insert.

Timothy Smith

T-SQL’s Native Bulk Insert Basics

January 8, 2019 by

From troubleshooting many data flow applications designed by others, I’ve seen a common pattern of over complexity with many designs. Putting aside possible risks by introducing too much complexity, troubleshooting these designs often involves opening many different applications – from a notepad file, to SSIS, to SQL Server Management Studio, to a script tool, etc. It may sound like many of these are doing a hundred steps, yet many times, they’re simply importing data from a file, or calling five stored procedures and then a file task of moving a file. This complexity is often unnecessary, as is opening many different tools when we can use a few tools and solve issues faster.

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Ranga Babu

SQL Server Code simplification using synonyms

January 4, 2019 by

Problem

In our environment, we use different DB servers and these servers are linked via Linked servers for cross server transactions. We use these linked servers in our stored procedures. The server names are different in different environments and we had to change the server names manually when we promote the stored procedures to other environments. There is a chance of errors while changing the server names manually. In this article let us see how can we eliminate changing the code manually.

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Sifiso W. Ndlovu

An MDS Driven Approach to a Turnaround Time Calculation in SQL Server

November 30, 2018 by

One calculation that you are almost guaranteed to have to produce in your career as a T-SQL developer relates to the calculation of a turnaround time. This is often a key KPI for measuring the performance of both individuals and teams, particularly when the business operates within a service-oriented sector i.e. customer support, transportation, healthcare etc. Turnaround time calculation does not only refer to business metrics rather any activity (i.e. ordering a pizza) with a recorded start and an end time can have its own turnaround time calculated. In this article we evaluate different options for calculating a turnaround time including using DATEDIFF function, creating your own user-defined function (UDF) as well as an integration with SQL Server Master Data Services.

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Bojan Petrovic

SQL index overview and strategy

November 27, 2018 by

A SQL index is used to retrieve data from a database very fast. Indexing a table or view is, without a doubt, one of the best ways to improve the performance of queries and applications.

A SQL index is a quick lookup table for finding records users need to search frequently. An index is small, fast, and optimized for quick lookups. It is very useful for connecting the relational tables and searching large tables.

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Prashanth Jayaram

Overview of the SQL CAST and SQL CONVERT functions in SQL Server

November 16, 2018 by

This article is an effort to discuss SQL Cast and SQL Convert functions as a follow-up to previous articles, in which we’ve discussed several SQL tips such as SQL Date, SQL Coalesce, SQL Union, SQL Join, SQL Like, SQL String etc.

Sometimes we need to convert data between different SQL data types. In addition to working with data, there are some built-in functions can be used to convert the data. So let’s take a closer look at the SQL conversion functions SQL CAST and SQL CONVERT in detail.

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Bojan Petrovic

SQL Join introduction and overview

November 15, 2018 by

A SQL Join clause is put within a Select statement and at the end, it’s given a join condition, which tells the database how to fetch your data. The column specified within the join condition must be preceded by a table name if the column name is the same in both tables. When a column is preceded with a table name, it’s known as a qualified column.

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