Istvan Martinka

Istvan Martinka

Istvan Martinka

Istvan is a Hungarian data warehouse guy living in New Zealand for the part 9 years. He studied economics and have a MSc degree. He ended up in the IT world after being thrown into the deep water of Business Intelligence by migrating SSAS OLAP cubes as his IT first project in 2007 (now it could be called the depths of a data lake…).

Since then he has dealt with every component of the Microsoft BI stack (all the S-es) and now he's finding his way into the clouds, without being clouded by its marketed potential and staying realistic.

He has spent 9 years consulting for various clients in many different industries and he still enjoys dealing with the nitty-gritty troubleshooting (such as "Why doesn't this Azure DB connection manager work?"), modelling data warehouse / data marts and anything in between: requirements gathering/analysis, development, implementation, …

The experience he gathered throughout the years helped him becoming a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert in the field of Business Intelligence.

He currently works for Farmlands, one of the largest agricultural cooperatives in New Zealand, developing and extending their data warehousing solutions.

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Istvan Martinka

How to connect and perform a SQL Server database restore from Azure BLOB storage

April 18, 2018 by

Having things in the cloud should make life simpler but I have experienced it’s not that straightforward. Once all access / configuration is sorted out then yes, of course! But in the meantime it can be tedious (even frustrating) and the end result is something that could have been achieved with a different method.

I think a significant chunk of what Azure offers is easier to do with the more conventional methods but that separates us from the advanced Azure features that a company would like to utilize in the shorter / longer term future. So there are reasons to spend some time / effort in getting things right up there.

In my case the task I needed to accomplish sounded simple enough:

  • get a SQL Server database backup (.bak file) from Azure blob storage
  • copy it to our own environment and restore it to a SQL Server instance on an Azure Windows VM
  • or skip the copy step and restore straight from blob storage
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