Kenneth Fisher

Kenneth Fisher

Kenneth Fisher

Kenneth works as a SQL Server Administrator near Dallas Texas. He started working with databases over 20 years ago and he’s been working in SQL Server for over 15 years now with a fairly even split between administration and development.

So far he collected an MCTS in 2005 administration and an MCITPs in 2008 administration and development. He enjoys writing and sharing some of the interesting bits and pieces he learned over the years.

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Kenneth Fisher

Latest posts by Kenneth Fisher (see all)

Reviewing the SQL Server Audit

December 25, 2014 by

Deciding what method to use to collect audit information can be a task in and of itself. Depending on your needs there are a number of different ways to collect the information. There are settings such as Login Auditing and Common Criteria Compliance that are fairly simple to implement but only collect very specific sets of information. There are also coding solutions such as Triggers and Audit Columns that are very flexible but can be tricky to get right. Then there are Profiler Traces but those have been deprecated and will be removed in a future version of SQL Server. Their replacement, Extended Events, has become easier and easier to use in recent versions and can be used to collect a huge variety of information. However Extended Events does not include any Audit specific information. If you are setting up an auditing solution in SQL Server you are probably going to want to consider using SQL Server Audits. Audits are based on Extended Events and so have all of the benefits of Extended Events but also include the audit specific events. Audits have a different interface than Extended Events and a different set of T-SQL Commands. Fortunately they are very easy. Read more »

Intro to Auditing in SQL Server

September 30, 2014 by

In the world of information, auditing serves an important purpose. It helps to provide an assurance that the data involved is accurate and safe. The level of assurance of course depends on any number of factors including the level of trust in those performing an audit (or collecting the data for the audit), the frequency the data is collected, and the types of data collected.

Any time the collection of data is this important to a process you can bet that a DBA is going to be involved. We get asked to create and run queries to pull data (frequently ridiculously complex queries, and rarely some simple ones). You could almost make it into a joke. Read more »